Best Grad Schools | US News & World Report | Medical Research 2023

Bench to bedside and beyond

Long School of Medicine faculty are international leaders in behavioral health, neuroscience, imaging research, cancer, diabetes, healthy development and aging, and many other fields.

Top 40

FY20 Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research rank

~1000

peer-reviewed articles published in FY20

$134.1M

in organized research awards in FY20

Researchers | Long School of Medicine | UT Health San Antonio

Meet our researchers

Our researchers are dedicated to translating discoveries into strategies and therapies that address real-world needs.

Our researchers

Researcher spotlight

Carolina Solis-Herrera, M.D., is a Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio and the Medical Director of the Diabetes Clinic at UT Health Physicians’ Medical Arts and Research Center (MARC). Dr. Solis-Herrera is the recipient of the prestigious 2021 Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (DDCF) Clinical Scientist Development Award. Her innovative and high-impact research focuses on sodium-glucose transport protein 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, a class of medications used to treat Type 2 diabetes. Hers was the only diabetes-related project among the 20 selected from a total of 254 submissions from around the country and the only project led by a physician-scientist in the Southwestern United States, including Texas.

David Gius, M.D., Ph.D., is the Associate Cancer Director of Translation Research, Assistant Dean for Research and Professor of Radiation Oncology at the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio. Dr. Gius has been awarded a $1.6 million UT System Faculty STARs award to support his research on aging and breast cancer. The award will be used to purchase advanced equipment that will allow him and other researchers to look at the connection between aging, metabolism and the development of high-risk estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. This advanced equipment will allow him and other researchers to look at the connection between aging, metabolism and the development of high-risk estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

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