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Dr. Panday brings new heart procedure to South Texas

Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2014


Cardiologist Manoj Panday, M.D., is one of the first South Texas physicians trained in implanting a new type of heart defibrillator that is safer for patients because it can be implanted within the chest wall instead of screwing one or more leads into the heart, which can cause complications.
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Cardiologist Manoj Panday, M.D., is one of the first South Texas physicians trained in implanting a new type of heart defibrillator that is safer for patients because it can be implanted within the chest wall instead of screwing one or more leads into the heart, which can cause complications.clear graphic

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Contact: Will Sansom, 210-567-2579

UT Medicine San Antonio cardiologist Manoj Panday, M.D., implanted a subcutaneous internal cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) into a patient at University Hospital on March 31.

The patient, who is at high risk for sudden cardiac arrest, was the first University Health System patient to be treated with this new device.

Dr. Panday performed two of the one-hour S-ICD implantations in the past month at the South Texas Veterans Health Care System. UT Medicine is the clinical practice of the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. University Hospital and the VA Hospital are two of the School of Medicine’s teaching hospitals.

Fewer complications
Like other defibrillators, the S-ICD system is a battery-powered device implanted underneath the skin that can save a patient’s life by delivering a shock to the heart. Unlike traditional defibrillators, however, the electrical lead for the S-ICD is implanted within the chest wall, eliminating the need to screw one or more leads into the heart itself.

“This reduces the risk of puncturing the heart or lungs, or injuring blood vessels through which we have had to track the leads,” Dr. Panday said. “This reduces the patient’s risk of contracting a systemic infection, such as endocarditis. It is advantageous that the new approach does not involve touching the heart or blood vessels.”

Dr. Panday (right) describes the surgery he performed in March on U.S. Army veteran Ruben Rivera (left), at the South Texas Veterans Health Care System.
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Dr. Panday (right) describes the surgery he performed in March on U.S. Army veteran Ruben Rivera (left), at the South Texas Veterans Health Care System.clear graphic

 

Beneficial for patients with high risk of sudden cardiac death
Dr. Panday, with the UT Medicine cardiology practice, is one of the first physicians in South Texas to be trained on how to implant this device. It is new technology and a new procedure that is not available yet in many parts of the country. The S-ICD system, made by Boston Scientific, only recently gained U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for treating patients who are at high risk for sudden cardiac death.

“The gentleman to be treated at University Hospital has a cardiomyopathy (weakening of the heart muscle with a low ejection fraction, which is a measure of heart pump function). The patient has scarring in the heart that puts him at risk of developing ventricular fibrillation (quivering of the heart without organized electrical activity),” said Dr. Panday. “This type of rhythm results in sudden death if not shocked quickly. Unfortunately, these patients often do not survive their first episode.”

The device detects abnormal heart rhythms and can quickly deliver an 80-joule shock to restore a normal rhythm. The device’s generator is implanted under the skin and contains a battery that generally lasts five years and can be replaced with an outpatient procedure.

Increases survival by 30 percent
This breakthrough technology marks the first time that an implantable device can prevent sudden cardiac arrest and save someone’s life without having a lead implanted inside the vascular space and heart. "With a defibrillator implanted, survival can be increased by 30 percent in high-risk patients. There is less overall procedural risk to the patient, but there is similar life-saving benefit with the S-ICD,” said Dr. Panday.

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UT Medicine San Antonio is the clinical practice of the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio. With more than 700 doctors — all School of Medicine faculty members — UT Medicine is the largest medical practice in Central and South Texas. Expertise is in more than 100 medical specialties and subspecialties. Primary care doctors and specialists see patients in private practice at UT Medicine’s flagship clinical home, the Medical Arts & Research Center (MARC), located at 8300 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio 78229. Most major health plans are accepted, and UT Medicine physicians also practice at several local and regional hospitals. Call 210-450-9000 to schedule an appointment, or visit http://www.utmedicine.org for a list of clinics and phone numbers.

 
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