HSC01
clear graphic
clear graphic

Biochemistry programmers reap part of $5 million NSF grant

Posted: Wednesday, December 18, 2013 · Volume: XLVI · Issue: 26

Share |


Borries Demeler, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry, is co-principal investigator of a $5 million National Science Foundation grant that will fund further development of a virtual tool that helps scientists from around the world analyze data using supercomputers in three locations. Click on picture to make it larger.
clear graphic
Borries Demeler, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry, is co-principal investigator of a $5 million National Science Foundation grant that will fund further development of a virtual tool that helps scientists from around the world analyze data using supercomputers in three locations. Click on picture to make it larger.clear graphic

Email Printer Friendly Format
 

By Will Sansom

Borries Demeler, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry, is co-principal investigator of a $5 million grant awarded this fall by the National Science Foundation.

Dr. Demeler, in collaboration with researchers at Indiana University and the University of California, San Diego, is further developing SciGap, a platform that makes it easier for researchers worldwide to analyze data using remote supercomputers in Texas, California and Germany.

Access to supercomputers
SciGaP (Science Gateway Platform) is a virtual environment to enhance scientists’ projects by giving them access to top-tier resources such as applications running on a supercomputer, remote instruments such as an electron microscope and cloud-based collections of data.

UltraScan developed in Department of Biochemistry
“SciGAP is a key component of software called UltraScan, which has been developed by Dr. Demeler with Dr. Emre Brookes and Gary Gorbet in the Department of Biochemistry,” said Bruce Nicholson, Ph.D., professor and chairman of biochemistry.

UltraScan is a package for analyzing data obtained from analytical ultracentrifugation, and X-ray and neutron-scattering experiments. An ultracentrifuge is a high-velocity centrifuge used in the separation of particles. “Investigators from around the world use UltraScan to analyze their data using remote supercomputing infrastructure,” Dr. Demeler said. “These experiments provide important information about the composition of biological and synthetic polymers, nanoparticles and nucleic acids. The analysis of such data requires demanding calculations that can only be performed on large supercomputers.”

More than 30,000 analyses completed in 2013
SciGap enables investigators to submit their analysis requests through user-friendly Web interfaces without concern for the arcane intricacies of supercomputer infrastructures, Dr. Demeler said. In 2013, SciGaP facilitated more than 30,000 analyses from investigators around the globe, consuming at least 7 million hours of computing time.

The Health Science Center offers analytical ultracentrifugation services through the Center for Analytical Ultracentrifugation of Macromolecular Assemblies, an institutionally supported core facility led by Dr. Demeler.

 
bottom bar

»printer friendly format...
»view more articles by issue#...
»search articles by keywords...
Arrow - to top
HSC Alert - Sign up today
Calendar of Events
Tell Us Your Story Idea
Submission Guidelines
Arrow - to top