HSC01
clear graphic
clear graphic

Take your child’s word for it on asthma, study finds

Posted on Monday, August 05, 2013 · Volume: XLVI · Issue: 16


Pamela Wood, M.D., a Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, said that both children and their caregivers should be included in the discussion of asthma at doctor visits. Click on images for a larger view.
clear graphic
Pamela Wood, M.D., a Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, said that both children and their caregivers should be included in the discussion of asthma at doctor visits. Click on images for a larger view. clear graphic

Email Printer Friendly Format
 

Contact: Will Sansom, 210-567-2579

SAN ANTONIO (July 29, 2013) — Children’s perceptions of living with asthma may differ significantly from their caregivers’ perceptions, which means both should be interviewed when they visit the doctor’s office, a new study from UT Kids San Antonio and the Center for Airway Inflammation Research (cAIR) shows.

The study analyzed the agreement between 79 children and their caregivers on health-related quality-of-life questionnaires. The children ranged in age from 5 to 17. Fifty-three were classified as having acute asthma and 26 had refractory, or treatment-resistant, asthma.

“The take-home message is that children need to be included in the communication process with health care providers, and physicians need to elicit the child’s perspective on their illness, health status, asthma symptoms and what is being done to treat their illness,” said senior author Pamela Wood, M.D., Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Joel Baseman, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Microbiology & Immunology, is director of the Center for Airway Inflammation Research (cAIR). The newly established research center at the UT Health Science Center’s South Texas Research Facility focuses on controlling and preventing acute and chronic airway diseases.
clear graphic
Joel Baseman, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Microbiology & Immunology, is director of the Center for Airway Inflammation Research (cAIR). The newly established research center at the UT Health Science Center’s South Texas Research Facility focuses on controlling and preventing acute and chronic airway diseases.clear graphic

 

UT Kids is the academic pediatric practice of the School of Medicine at the Health Science Center. cAIR is a newly established research center at the Health Science Center’s South Texas Research Facility that focuses on controlling and preventing acute and chronic airway diseases. Joel Baseman, Ph.D., is the director.

Valued responses
Study lead author Margaret Burks, M.D., a 2013 graduate of the School of Medicine who is now an intern at Vanderbilt University, said children should be empowered to take control of their asthma. "Encouraging an environment where children can talk freely with their caregiver is important, and can start with allowing the child to participate in the office visit,” Dr. Burks said. “It is important that children feel that their response to their disease is valued, not only by their physician but by their caregiver, as well."

Children were asked to rate their own limitations on activity, while caregivers were asked to rate the effect that the children’s limitations had on family activities. “Overall, children viewed themselves as less impaired, in comparison to how caregivers viewed the limitations that the asthma placed on the family,” Dr. Wood said.

Transparency is needed
Parents may not want to acknowledge a lack of communication when they go to a doctor’s office. "I think there is often a concern in the minds of caregivers about how they appear to the physician,” Dr. Burks said. “Caregivers may not want to seem out of touch with their child's day-to-day health, and, in such fear, they may dominate the conversation at the office visit. Our study demonstrates that it is helpful to gain insight from both the caregiver and the child.”

Describing life with asthma to a health care provider can be an inexact science, to be sure. “There is no gold standard,” Dr. Wood said. “We can’t use a thermometer to measure quality of life.”

The study is in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Other study co-authors are Edward Brooks, M.D., professor of pediatrics in the School of Medicine; Jay Peters, M.D., professor of medicine; and Vanessa Hill, M.D., formerly assistant professor of pediatrics.

This work was supported by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases grants 3U19AI070412-04S1 and 5U19AI070412, The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio Medical Student Research Program, and award 8UL1TR000149 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

# # #

UT Kids™ San Antonio is the academic pediatric practice of the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio. With almost 100 pediatric physicians and surgeons — all faculty members of the Health Science Center’s School of Medicine — UT Kids™ San Antonio is the largest pediatric practice in Central and South Texas offering top-tier expertise in numerous medical specialties and subspecialties. Most major health plans are accepted. Call 210-358-5437 to schedule an appointment.

 
Share |

Top stories this week »



bottom bar

printer friendly format »
view more articles by issue »
search articles by keywords »
Arrow - to top
Arrow - to top