HSC01
clear graphic
clear graphic

Vascular biology researcher to give Montiel Lecture

Posted: Tuesday, April 02, 2013 · Volume: XLVI · Issue: 7

Share |


Michael Gimbrone, M.D., performed the first experiments that demonstrated the dependence of solid tumor growth on the formation of new blood vessels. He also discovered novel genes involved in the prevention of heart attacks and stroke. Click on photo to see a larger view.
clear graphic
Michael Gimbrone, M.D., performed the first experiments that demonstrated the dependence of solid tumor growth on the formation of new blood vessels. He also discovered novel genes involved in the prevention of heart attacks and stroke. Click on photo to see a larger view. clear graphic

Email Printer Friendly Format
 

Contact: Will Sansom, 210-567-2579

Mark 4 p.m. April 16 on your calendar as a time to hear from a distinguished scientist in the field of vascular biology.

Michael A Gimbrone Jr., M.D., will present the Sixth Annual Milka Montiel Lecture, sponsored by the Department of Pathology. The lecture will be in room 409L of the School of Medicine building at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio.

Dr. Gimbrone is the Elsie T. Friedman Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Excellence in Vascular Biology at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

His topic for the Montiel Lecture is “Understanding Vascular Endothelium: Nature’s Container for Blood.”

First research tying tumor growth to formation of new blood vessels
As a postdoctoral fellow in the 1970s, Dr. Gimbrone performed the first experiments that demonstrated the dependence of solid tumor growth on the formation of new blood vessels. Research in his laboratory has led to the discovery of novel genes that provide potential targets for the prevention of heart attacks and stroke.

He is a recipient of the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Heart Association, the King Faisal International Prize in Medicine, the Okamoto Award from the Japan Vascular Disease Research Foundation and numerous other honors.

The Montiel Lecture honors Milka Mukhlova Montiel, M.D., a pathology faculty member at the Health Science Center from 1973 to 2002. Among her contributions, she was a leader in the development of pathology services at the Health Science Center’s teaching hospital, University Hospital, and in the Department of Pathology’s labs.

###

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, one of the country’s leading health sciences universities, ranks in the top 3 percent of all institutions worldwide receiving National Institutes of Health funding. The university’s schools of medicine, nursing, dentistry, health professions and graduate biomedical sciences have produced approximately 28,000 graduates. The $736 million operating budget supports eight campuses in San Antonio, Laredo, Harlingen and Edinburg. For more information on the many ways “We make lives better®,” visit www.uthscsa.edu.


 
bottom bar

»printer friendly format...
»view more articles by issue#...
»search articles by keywords...
Arrow - to top
HSC Alert - Sign up today
Calendar of Events
Tell Us Your Story Idea
Submission Guidelines
Arrow - to top