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Carlisle Center for Bone & Mineral Imaging dedicated

Posted: Tuesday, February 05, 2013 · Volume: XLVI · Issue: 3

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Daniel W. Carlisle, M.D., former chair of the Department of Orthopaedics, was honored recently with the naming of the department’s new microCT Core Laboratory in his memory.
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Daniel W. Carlisle, M.D., former chair of the Department of Orthopaedics, was honored recently with the naming of the department’s new microCT Core Laboratory in his memory. clear graphic

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RAYO, The Daniel W. Carlisle Center for Bone & Mineral Imaging, was recently dedicated in the Department of Orthopaedics, in memory of former department Chair Daniel W. Carlisle, M.D.

The ceremony, held Dec. 14, was attended by more than 40 people from various areas of the UT Health Science Center San Antonio.

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Dr. Carlisle promoted education and research
“RAYO is the Spanish word for ray or ray of light,” explained Roberto Fajardo, Ph.D., assistant professor of orthopaedics and the director of the new microCT Core Laboratory named for Dr. Carlisle. Dr. Fajardo, who was recruited to the Health Science Center by Dr. Carlisle, was one of several speakers at the event.

“This name was chosen because Dr. Carlisle emphasized the importance of education and the expansion of research in our department. Education through mentoring and research brings light to individuals and communities through knowledge. On another level, Dr. Carlisle touched many lives during his professional career and personal life, bringing light to those lives. And finally, the name has a natural meaning for an X-ray imaging lab,” Dr. Fajardo said.

Facility offers high-resolution, high-energy X-ray imaging
The microCT Core Facility is located in the School of Medicine, room 579C. It offers high-resolution and high-energy X-ray imaging techniques that can quantitatively and accurately analyze the 3-D structure of bone and mineral. According to Dr. Fajardo, the technology is a standard for analysis in studies of bone and mineral in aging, disease, tissue engineering and therapeutics.

The dedication ceremony was organized by Dr. Fajardo, Virginia Calley, a research assistant in Dr. Fajardo’s lab, and James Schmitz, the microCT Core facility manager. Among the speakers was the new department chair, Robert Quinn, M.D., professor and the John J. Hinchey M.D., and Kathryn Hinchey Chair in Orthopaedic Surgery. Other speakers included Michael Wilson, Ph.D., director of the Institutional Research Core Facilities; and Lee Carlisle, M.D., Dr. Daniel Carlisle’s former wife, and medical director of the Medical Arts & Research Center’s Ambulatory Surgery Center at UT Medicine San Antonio.

Region benefits from new research technology
“Dr. Carlisle’s vision was that the department’s investment in the microCT technology would develop into a shared resource that would benefit research throughout the university and the San Antonio region,” Dr. Wilson said. “Naming the laboratory in his honor is just one small way of recognizing all the contributions he made to the Department of Orthopaedics and the university.”

A life of achievement
The valedictorian of the 1991 School of Medicine class at UT Health Science Center San Antonio, Dr. Carlisle returned to his alma mater in 2002 to train and supervise the training of orthopaedic residents. He served as interim chair and was then named chair of the Department of Orthopaedics in 2007 through 2010, when he retired for health reasons before his death.

Dr. Carlisle had a strong interest in research, as well as education. “Four years ago, Dr. Carlisle expressed a desire to establish this microCT lab in the Department of Orthopaedics,” Dr. Fajardo said.

“He was willing to make a departmental investment in high-cost, high-tech imaging equipment to further research within our department. But he also saw this as a win-win opportunity for the Department of Orthopaedics and our institution. The investment now aids our department’s research efforts and enhances research projects all over campus,” Dr. Fajardo said.

Coordinated support across the campus
“Dr. Carlisle worked closely with Robin Brey, (M.D., professor and chair of neurology), Brian Herman, (Ph.D., former Health Science Center vice president for research) and many others in an effort to acquire our first desktop microCT system,” Dr. Fajardo said. “Since that first acquisition, we have received support from university’s Core Research Facility committee, Dr. David Weiss, (Ph.D., the current vice president for research), Dr. Wilson and other faculty members.”

Educational outreach
In addition to the dedication of Carlisle Center for Bone & Mineral Imaging, Dr. Fajardo and his colleagues are honoring Dr. Carlisle through a new educational outreach effort for high school students. The first educational seminar was also held Dec. 14 at Health Careers High School, where four orthopaedics faculty members made presentations. The presenters and their topics included:
Family members and close friends of Dr. Daniel Carlisle’s who attended the dedication ceremony were (left to right) Monica Jones, niece; Michael Daugherty, lifelong friend; Lee Carlisle, M.D., former wife; Jack Carlisle, son; Daniel Carlisle Jr., son; Cindy Jones, sister; Chris Jones, brother-in-law; Andrea Stella, mother-in-law; and Tara Jones, niece.
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Family members and close friends of Dr. Daniel Carlisle’s who attended the dedication ceremony were (left to right) Monica Jones, niece; Michael Daugherty, lifelong friend; Lee Carlisle, M.D., former wife; Jack Carlisle, son; Daniel Carlisle Jr., son; Cindy Jones, sister; Chris Jones, brother-in-law; Andrea Stella, mother-in-law; and Tara Jones, niece.clear graphic

 

With the help of Catherine Gonzalez, a teacher of anatomy and physiology at Health Careers High School, the faculty presentations integrated into the course curriculum for the junior and senior high school students. Prior to the presentations, students received reading assignments from the orthopaedics faculty and were required to address several questions pertaining to each talk.

Dr. Fajardo said there are plans to expand the educational outreach presentations to other high schools in order to develop the generation orthopaedic surgeons, as Dr. Carlisle would have wanted.

Dr. Carlisle’s family
In addition to her role at UT Medicine San Antonio — the School of Medicine's faculty practice — Dr. Lee Carlisle, Dr. Daniel Carlisle’s former wife, is an assistant professor and head of UT Medicine Anesthesiology, which supplies anesthesia services for outpatient sites of service.

She and Dr. Daniel Carlisle have two sons, Daniel C.B. Carlisle Jr., age 18, and Jack Harrison Carlisle, age 16.

 
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