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School of Nursing unveils new Simulation Center

Posted on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 · Volume: XLV · Issue: 13


Cutting the ribbon for the Simulation Center and Clinical Learning Lab are School of Nursing Dean Eileen T. Breslin, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, and Kenneth I. Shine, M.D., UT System executive vice chancellor for health affairs. President William L. Henrich, M.D., MACP, looks on from the left.
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Cutting the ribbon for the Simulation Center and Clinical Learning Lab are School of Nursing Dean Eileen T. Breslin, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, and Kenneth I. Shine, M.D., UT System executive vice chancellor for health affairs. President William L. Henrich, M.D., MACP, looks on from the left. clear graphic

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By Rosanne Fohn

More than 150 faculty members, dignitaries, donors and guests filled a School of Nursing lecture hall on June 13 to celebrate the opening of the $3.9 million Simulation Center and Clinical Learning Lab.

The 7,281-square-foot simulated hospital features a wide variety of settings, including a trauma center, intensive care unit, maternal/child center, pediatric care suite, ambulatory care suite and home health setting. In the Simulation Center nursing students and interprofessional teams of students and residents will learn to appraise and respond to unique clinical scenarios and evaluate their responses.

“Simulation provides the opportunity for clinical education in a safe and controlled environment,” explained Eileen T. Breslin, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, dean of the School of Nursing.

“Our goal was to create an exciting, fast-paced learning environment that will give students a taste of what their profession will be like in the real world. We wanted them to feel the passion of nursing and encourage them to begin thinking more creatively about new interventions to save people’s lives. The best thing is that we are also able to provide a realistic practice environment for interprofessional teams so that all of our health professional students and residents can experience the teamwork that is so necessary in patient care. The sooner we can expose them to reality-based teamwork, the better prepared they will be to provide better care for patients.”
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Creative partnerships provide funding
William L. Henrich, M.D., MACP, Health Science Center president, said, “This Simulation Center is among the most advanced in the nation and it was because of funds from generous philanthropic institutions, individuals and creative partnerships within the community that it came to fruition. No state funds were used to build this. I commend Dean Breslin and her team for their visionary work. This was a dream of your school and it happened because you all believe in nursing and nursing education for our community.”

Simulation Center supports IOM goals for nursing
Kenneth I. Shine, M.D., UT System executive vice chancellor for health affairs, praised the School of Nursing for its innovative approach and for embracing the 2010 Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing report and guidelines. “With more than 3 million members, the nursing profession is the largest segment of the nation’s health care workforce. Working on the front lines of patient care, nurses have a direct effect on patient care. Their regular, close proximity to patients and scientific understanding of care translate across the continuum of care and gives them a unique ability to effect wide-reaching changes in the health care system,” he said.

The IOM Report has four key messages:
  • Nurses should practice to the full extent of their education and training;
  • Nurses should achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education;
  • Nurses should be full partners, with physicians and other health care professionals, in redesigning health care in the United States; and
  • Effective workforce planning and policy making require better data collection and an improved information infrastructure.
“As I look at the work of this School of Nursing related to these efforts,” Dr. Shine said, “I know we are leading the way. This Simulation Center will be the nexus for addressing these recommendations and ensuring that safe, quality care exists for San Antonio and beyond.”

Lisa Cleveland, Ph.D., RN, IBCLC, assistant professor in the School of Nursing, demonstrates a newborn simulation manikin for guests in the Simulation Center and Clinical Learning Lab.
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Lisa Cleveland, Ph.D., RN, IBCLC, assistant professor in the School of Nursing, demonstrates a newborn simulation manikin for guests in the Simulation Center and Clinical Learning Lab.clear graphic

 

Following the ribbon-cutting ceremony, the guests were invited to tour the Simulation Center, where faculty and students demonstrated the simulation manikins and conducted scenarios to show the center’s capabilities.

School of Nursing achievements
In addition to the construction of the Simulation Center, the School of Nursing has achieved a number of other major milestones over the past year:
  • In January, the School of Nursing received formal approval from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to enroll students in the Doctor of Nursing Practice program, a first for South Texas
  • The undergraduate nursing program has grown by 20 percent by increasing enrollment in the traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program and creating an accelerated BSN program for students with a degree in another field
  • The School of Nursing was reaccredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education for its bachelor’s and master’s degree programs for 10 years — the maximum granted by the commission.
  • Dean Breslin was chosen nurse-elect of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. She will serve a two-year term as president from 2014 to 2016.
There are approximately 800 students in the School of Nursing pursuing bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees.

 
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