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Five named to UT Academy of Health Science Education

Posted: Monday, May 18, 2009 · Volume: XLII · Issue: 10

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Contact: Will Sansom, (210) 567-2579

(From left) Michael Lichtenstein, M.D.; Nan Clare, M.D.; Thomas King, Ph.D.; and Susan Naylor, Ph.D.; were inducted into the UT Academy of Health Science Education.
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(From left) Michael Lichtenstein, M.D.; Nan Clare, M.D.; Thomas King, Ph.D.; and Susan Naylor, Ph.D.; were inducted into the UT Academy of Health Science Education.clear graphic

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SAN ANTONIO (May 13, 2009) — Five longtime faculty members of The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have been invited to join The University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education. Only 12 faculty of UT System health institutions are admitted annually.

Susan Naylor, Frank Weaker, Thomas King, Michael Lichtenstein and Nan Clare will be inducted for outstanding teaching of tomorrow’s biomedical scientists and health care professionals. This includes classroom teaching, mentorship of research projects in laboratories and development of innovative health science curricula.

The induction is set for February 2010 in Austin during the academy’s annual meeting.

Naylor, a geneticist who helped lead international efforts to map and sequence human chromosome 3, teaches students from the School of Medicine and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

Frank Weaker, Ph.D., who teaches microscopic anatomy in the Dental School and School of Health Professions, also was inducted into the UT Academy of Health Science Education.
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Frank Weaker, Ph.D., who teaches microscopic anatomy in the Dental School and School of Health Professions, also was inducted into the UT Academy of Health Science Education.clear graphic

 

Weaker teaches microscopic anatomy to Dental School students, lectures in gross anatomy courses, and teaches anatomy to occupational therapy and dental hygiene students from the School of Health Professions.

King teaches microscopic anatomy to students in the School of Medicine.

Lichtenstein is the principal investigator for research education and career development for the Institute for the Integration of Medicine and Science. This institute administers the Health Science Center’s Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) from the National Institutes of Health. He also oversees grants extending science and research training in public schools.

Clare oversees the School of Medicine curriculum committee, which is charged with recommending changes to improve the preparation of physicians and to ensure the school is keeping up with national trends.

Trio previously wins UT Academy award for virtual microscopy project
In 2007, Drs. King, Weaker and Clare won an award from the UT Academy of Health Science Education for a project titled “Virtual Microscopy for Health Professionals.” This advancement enables students to view prepared slides on a computer screen with no drop in resolution. Unlike the traditional microscope, it makes possible the study of slides at home and by several students at a time.

Other Health Science Center faculty members have won UT Academy of Health Science Education awards for projects including a medical education academy for teens, wireless approaches to classroom education, end-of-life communication skills for interdisciplinary trainees, and assessments of medical residents’ and students’ ability to examine newborns.

UT Academy made of up distinguished scholars
The UT Academy of Health Science Education, established in 2005, is a formal organization of distinguished scholars recognized for their teaching excellence, and is committed to the enhancement of health science education.

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The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is the leading research institution in South Texas and one of the major health sciences universities in the world. With an operating budget of $668 million, the Health Science Center is the chief catalyst for the $16.3 billion biosciences and health care sector in San Antonio’s economy. The Health Science Center has had an estimated $36 billion impact on the region since inception and has expanded to six campuses in San Antonio, Laredo, Harlingen and Edinburg. More than 26,000 graduates (physicians, dentists, nurses, scientists and other health professionals) serve in their fields, including many in Texas. Health Science Center faculty are international leaders in cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, aging, stroke prevention, kidney disease, orthopaedics, research imaging, transplant surgery, psychiatry and clinical neurosciences, pain management, genetics, nursing, dentistry and many other fields. For more information, visit www.uthscsa.edu.

 
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