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Human Brain Mapping journal rated No. 1 in impact

Posted: Monday, December 01, 2008 · Volume: XLI · Issue: 24

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Contact: Will Sansom, (210) 567-2579


The UT Health Science Center’s journal Human Brain Mapping is the top-rated journal in the category of radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging.
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The UT Health Science Center’s journal Human Brain Mapping is the top-rated journal in the category of radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging.clear graphic

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SAN ANTONIO (Nov. 21, 2008) — Human Brain Mapping, a journal launched in the early 1990s by faculty of The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, is now tops in scientific impact among the scores of journals ranked in the category of radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging.

Human Brain Mapping registered an impact factor of 6.15 in 2007, placing it above the 87 other journals in this category. The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) of Thomsen Scientific compiles and releases the impact factor data each year.

An impact factor is the rate at which articles in a journal are cited by subsequent scientific articles. The ISI impact factor is the most widely accepted index of publication quality.

Peter T. Fox, M.D., and Jack L. Lancaster, Ph.D., professors in the Health Science Center’s Research Imaging Center and Department of Radiology, are co-editors-in-chief of Human Brain Mapping. Dr. Fox, director of the Research Imaging Center, is also appointed in the Neurology, Psychiatry and Physiology departments.


Dr. Peter T. Fox proposed the journal Human Brain Mapping in 1991 because no journals at that time were discussing the use of imaging as a tool for neuroscience research.
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Dr. Peter T. Fox proposed the journal Human Brain Mapping in 1991 because no journals at that time were discussing the use of imaging as a tool for neuroscience research.clear graphic

 

“I proposed Human Brain Mapping to our publisher in 1991 because the existing imaging-oriented journals were focused exclusively on diagnostic uses of imaging. Clinical imaging journals were not interested in articles describing the use of imaging as a tool for neuroscience research,” Dr. Fox said. “At that time, newly developed imaging methods were starting to redefine how neuroscience is performed. Because imaging is non-invasive, it could be applied in humans, including normal volunteers. We were learning for the first time about the functional and structural organization of the normal human brain. I decided to create a journal to be the venue for this scientific paradigm shift. That our impact factor is now so high reflects how far the field of neuroscience imaging has come in the past 15 years.”

The Research Imaging Center has served as the editorial office for Human Brain Mapping since the journal’s inception.

“We have been in the top five in this category for several years, and in the top two on and off, but this is the first time we have been No. 1,” Dr. Lancaster said. “This is a landmark event for the journal.”

The journal is published by John Wiley and Sons Inc. and is an important source of information for neuroscientists worldwide. “The field of neuroscience imaging is continuing to grow and evolve. The growth of the journal reflects this,” Dr. Fox said. “A very exciting example is the use of image-derived measurements of brain structure and function as quantitative phenotypes for gene discovery.”

Gene discovery using imaging was the topic of a special issue of the journal in 2007. That issue was very highly cited, Dr. Fox said.

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The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is the leading research institution in South Texas and one of the major health sciences universities in the world. With an operating budget of $668 million, the Health Science Center is the chief catalyst for the $16.3 billion biosciences and health care sector in San Antonio’s economy. The Health Science Center has had an estimated $36 billion impact on the region since inception and has expanded to six campuses in San Antonio, Laredo, Harlingen and Edinburg. More than 24,000 graduates (physicians, dentists, nurses, scientists and other health professionals) serve in their fields, including many in Texas. Health Science Center faculty are international leaders in cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, aging, stroke prevention, kidney disease, orthopaedics, research imaging, transplant surgery, psychiatry and clinical neurosciences, pain management, genetics, nursing, dentistry and many other fields. For more information, visit www.uthscsa.edu.

 
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