Team develops new way to ID genetic changes in lymphoma

Posted: Thursday, October 17, 2013

Ricardo C.T. Aguiar, M.D., Ph.D., developed a novel approach to identify the transfer of genetic material from one chromosome to another, a hallmark of cancer cells. His team also identified three new targets for the development of potential therapies to treat lymphoma. 

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Ricardo C.T. Aguiar, M.D., Ph.D., developed a novel approach to identify the transfer of genetic material from one chromosome to another, a hallmark of cancer cells. His team also identified three new targets for the development of potential therapies to treat lymphoma.  

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Contact: Will Sansom, 210-567-2579

SAN ANTONIO (Oct. 14, 2013) — Support from the Max and Minnie Tomerlin Voelcker Fund and the Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) have led to a significant finding about lymphoma, one of the most common and aggressive types of cancer.

The funding supported the research of Ricardo C.T. Aguiar, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of medicine in the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio.

He has developed a novel approach to identify chromosomal translocations (the transfer of genetic material from one chromosome to another), which is a hallmark of cancer cells. Dr. Aguiar and his team used this strategy to diagnose known genetic changes in lymphoma and discover several new ones.
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Existing methods of discovering the chromosomal changes are labor intensive and biased toward known changes, the authors wrote in Blood, the premier journal in the area of hematological cancers. The team discovered a new method that readily identified three novel targets for development of potential therapies to treat lymphoma.

The group collaborated with the Department of Pathology in the School of Medicine and with colleagues at UT Austin.

See the citations and acknowledgements for this study.

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