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Brenda Gannon, PhD is first author on paper published in the ACNP Neuropsychopharmacology journal!

Dr. Gannon, along with her mentor, Gregory Collins, PhD and lab members, published the article titled Reinforcing Effects of Binary Mixtures of Common bath salts Constituents: Studies with 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), 3,4-Methylenedioxymethcathinone (Methylone), and Caffeine in Rats. Dr. Gannon is a postdoctoral fellow on the NIDA T32DA031115 Training Program titled: Postdoctoral Training in Drug Abuse Research Behavior & Neurobiology

The abstract and link to the article are below.



Reinforcing Effects of Binary Mixtures of Common bath salts Constituents: Studies with 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), 3,4-Methylenedioxymethcathinone (Methylone), and Caffeine in Rats

Brenda M Gannon1, Kayla I Galindo1, Melson P Mesmin1, Kenner C Rice2 and Gregory T Collins1,3

1Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX
2Molecular Targets and Medications Discovery Branch, NIDA and NIAAA, Bethesda, MD
3South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX

Correspondence: Dr GT Collins, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Pharmacology, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr MC 7764, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA, Tel: +210 567 4199, Fax: +210 567 1581, E-mail: CollinsG@uthscsa.edu


Abstract

Bath salts use is associated with high rates of abuse, toxicity, and death. Bath salts preparations often contain mixtures of drugs including multiple synthetic cathinones (eg, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone [MDPV] or 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone [methylone]) or synthetic cathinones and caffeine; however, little is known about whether interactions among bath salts constituents contribute to the abuse-related effects of bath salts preparations. This study used male Sprague Dawley rats responding under a progressive ratio schedule to quantify the reinforcing effectiveness of MDPV, methylone, and caffeine, administered alone and as binary mixtures (n=12 per mixture). Each mixture was evaluated at four ratios (10:1, 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3) relative to the mean ED50 for each drug alone. Dose-addition analyses were used to determine the predicted, additive effect for each dose pair within each drug mixture. MDPV, methylone, and caffeine each maintained responding in a dose-dependent manner, with MDPV being the most potent and effective, and caffeine being the least potent and effective of the three bath salts constituents. High levels of responding were also maintained by each of the bath salts mixtures. Although the nature of the interactions tended towards additivity for most bath salts mixtures, supra-additive (3:1 MDPV:caffeine, and 3:1 and 1:1 methylone:caffeine) and sub-additive (3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 MDPV:methylone) interactions were also observed. Together, these findings demonstrate that the composition of bath salts preparations can impact both their reinforcing potency and effectiveness, and suggest that such interactions among constituent drugs could contribute to the patterns of use and effects reported by human bath salts users.